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FUEL PROTECTION

Old 04-01-2004, 04:58 AM
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LongRC
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Default FUEL PROTECTION

I’m looking for a homemade technique on keeping my glow fuel fresh and to prevent it from being affected by condensation or any type of moisture. If there are no home techniques, then a commercial product will be sufficient.

I apologize if I’m beating a dead horse or asking a redundant question.
Old 04-01-2004, 10:01 AM
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Jim Thomerson
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Default RE: FUEL PROTECTION

There is a product, a gas, you can put in the fuel container which keeps air away from the fuel. However, I think you are dealing with a nonexistant problem. Why do you think you should be concerned?

Jim
Old 04-01-2004, 12:01 PM
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LongRC
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Default RE: FUEL PROTECTION

I want to transfer some of the fuel from the metal can into a plastic container so I’m worried about condensation and moister building up in that plastic container.
Old 04-01-2004, 07:04 PM
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Parkerm
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Default RE: FUEL PROTECTION

Pick a day with low humidiy. Cool the plastic container in the freezer or refrigerator (that will drive moisture out of the air in the plastic bottle because cold air can't hold moisture). Pour the fuel in and seal it up TIGHT.
As the plastic bottle warms it will start to pressure up. It is ok to vent the pressure off, it is low humidity air that is expanding after being cold. Just be sure no air is allowed to enter from outside.
Humidity in the air, when allowed to make contact with the fuel is what ruins it. In dry climates it is much less of a problem.
Old 04-02-2004, 07:43 AM
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Default RE: FUEL PROTECTION

Just pour the fuel and forget it. You have to keep the fuel uncapped for days to collect enough moisture to be a problem. You won't have any water condensation even when you have enough water to cause the oil to seperate. Think about it to distill alcohol you bring the water and alcohol mixture up to about 180 degrees and then condense the vapor evaporating. The result is mostly alcohol. What you see condensing in a jug of fuel is almost all alcohol even if contaminated with water.
Old 04-02-2004, 09:16 AM
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Parkerm
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Default RE: FUEL PROTECTION

Absolutely correct, with one caveat. The surface area of the fuel that is exposed to the air. If a standard one gallon bottle is filled into the neck less surface area is exposed to moisture bearing air. If the jug is half full and moisture bearing air is allowed to make contact it will go bad faster. Up to 15 times faster by my calculations. That's why full bottles seem to be always good, and the fuel only goes bad after you use half of it.
So if you are using your fuel at a high rate it is not a problem, but if like me you have several different mixtures around for different engines, and you only fly once a week you better keep a good tight seal on it.

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