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Probond Caution

Old 09-22-2002, 03:33 AM
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Default Probond Caution

People who use Probond Polyurethane Glue may want to read and heed the warnings on the label. "Warning: Exposure may result in acute or delayed damage to the lungs. Eye irritant. May irritate or cause allergic reaction with skin. Inhalation of aerosol may result in respiatory allergies including asthma." This is just a portion of the warnings and the label continues with the warning that persons with asthma should not use this product. Did this stop me? Of course not. I thought plenty of ventilation and the use of a respirator would stop the effects of the Probond. Wrong. I believe the glue set off an asthmatic reaction and even the medications I use didn't help a whole lot. I did recover but I am not going to use Probond again even though I really liked the way the balsa sheeting stuck to the foam core. This is not to slam Probond. They warned me and, except for side effects, the glue worked great.
Old 09-22-2002, 10:20 PM
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Default Probond Caution

You use the term "probond" rather loosly as they also make alfataic resens [two kinds] which work very well and have nobad habits I use them all the timemostly in place of CA. Cures almost as quick and I think is stronger.
Old 09-24-2002, 06:52 AM
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Default Tommie.....

....you mentioned Probond Polyurethane Glue ? As far as i know
anything Polyurethane is "fumey" as can be . There was as time, about 20 years ago....I had chronic asthma. I had to use the alphalic resin glue ( regular old wood glue ). Check the label for this type of glue. There was no mention of ventliation, or the need for respirators with this stuff.

E-mail, or PM me for more info.

Dave.
Old 09-28-2002, 03:22 PM
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Default Probond Caution

Tommie clearly said "Probond Polyurethane Glue " in his post so he's not guilty, but a lot of other people do use the name "Probond" loosely when they really mean only the polyurethane. The "Probond" name actually is used for a whole line of adhesives Borden (Elmer's) makes, including polyurethane, aliphatic resin, and others. But this is not so clear when all you see on a shelf is one of the products. The company could do more to make this point clear to its customers.

30 or so years ago modelers started to use other adhesives besides Ambroid, and one of the first was Titebond aliphatic resin. I never liked the way it behaved but eventually found Wilhold aliphatic and it was great. Wilhold has gotten hard to find (at least around here where I live) for some years now, but I have been very happy with Probond aliphatic for wood joints.
Old 09-30-2002, 11:40 PM
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Default WHICH PROBOND?

to clear things up for me: which Probond is used to sheet foam wings?

THNX Vasek
Old 09-30-2002, 11:57 PM
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Default Probond Caution

Vasek
I used Probond Polyurethane Glue for the foam sheeting. This week I had to remove some of the balsa covering for the flap well and the glue had bonded the sheet balsa to the foam as well as anything I have used. I realize that there are several glues using the probond name but I thought I had identified the Probond Polyurethane as the glue used to sheet the foam cores. Sorry for any confusion this may have caused. By the way, there are several threads that relate to covering foam cores using polyurethane glues.
Old 10-01-2002, 12:11 AM
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Default Probond Caution

What respitator did you use, was it a carbon canister type? That is the only type of respirator, short of forced air feed facemask that will trap the fumes.

Vince
Old 10-01-2002, 12:40 AM
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Default Probond Caution

Vince
The respirator I used was one from MSA Safety Works that has replaceble cartridges. I purchased it from Home Depot or Lowes. The respirator instructions also had a warning that stated "Do not use for urethane paints or other paints containing diisocyanates because of their poor warning properties. Use against such contaminants could result in severe permanent damage to the respiratory system. Use Air Supplied Respirators." In my case, when all else fails, I read the instructions. The only reason I posted this message was to let others benefit from my mistake.
Old 10-01-2002, 03:13 AM
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Default Probond Caution

Hey guys,
It is prudent to use gloves,mask and proper ventilation when using polyurethane glue, CA, epoxy, epoxy resins and most paints. Take a look at the labels most contain some pretty nasty stuff. Don't jeopardize your health wear the proper protective equipment.
Old 10-01-2002, 03:28 PM
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Default polyurethane..

is bad stuff..we use polyurethane paint in the paint shop..carbon canisters don't cut it with the isocyanates in the paint, forced air is what you have to use. Exposure to isocyanates causes permanent, irreversible lung damage. Smells like bananas.

I don't get the same smell from Probond polyurethane glue...it has the same nasty stuff in it, as Tommie will testify to, but I just use good ventilation and get out as soon as it is weighted down..by the time it has set up, the fumes are gone.

Your body gets sensitized to these things (some people get it from CA or epoxy) with repeated exposure where even the slightest exposure sets off a reaction. I have a sensitization to poison ivy..the smallest little patch makes it very hard for me to breath..

But I only use it to sheet wings, and only do a couple a year....

It is great, wonderful, stuff IMHO for this purpose.
Old 10-01-2002, 11:50 PM
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Default HUH???

Chuck you really sheet wings with poison Ivy???
never tried that one will have to go to Tommie's house and mix up a batch. We'll see if he is allergic to that also..
LOL



Don///
Old 10-02-2002, 12:21 AM
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Default Re: HUH???

Originally posted by perdo
Chuck you really sheet wings with poison Ivy???
never tried that one will have to go to Tommie's house and mix up a batch. We'll see if he is allergic to that also..
LOL



Don///
Yep..what, you ain't seen all the blisters on my covering jobs?? LOL
Old 10-02-2002, 12:53 AM
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Default Re: polyurethane..

Originally posted by ChuckAuger
is bad stuff..we use polyurethane paint in the paint shop..carbon canisters don't cut it with the isocyanates in the paint, forced air is what you have to use.
I agree, that in a closed painting environment a carbon canister face mask will not cut it, it is perfectly suitable for the average hobby use. In a paint vapor saturated environment a carbon canister mask would be rendered inefective almost immediatly.

Vince
Old 10-02-2002, 01:08 AM
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Default ChuckAuger says....

....I have a sensitization to poison ivy..the smallest little patch makes it very hard for me to breath....

Chuck....don't stick any more little patches of
poison ivy up your nose.

Dave.
Old 10-02-2002, 07:45 PM
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Default Probond Caution

I am currently using Elmer's Probond Professional Strength Interior glue (aliphatic resin). It sands well.

Bruce
Old 10-02-2002, 09:35 PM
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Default Probond

In all honesty guys I should not have made fun of this thread.
Tommie did have a very serious reaction to the glue that he used to sheet the wing skins. He sounded terrible for a couple weeks and did seek medical help to get over it..




Don///
Old 10-02-2002, 11:17 PM
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Default Probond caution

Hi Guys,

Just read ya'll post, I agree, read labels, but I did find another great use for ProBond a couple days ago and would like to share.
I've just finished building a gaint warbird (DH Hornet) which came out around 40 pounds, being a tail dragger I thought I used the correct Du-Bro low bounce tail wheel, wrong, it would nearly go flat or wobble bad down the runway, fix was, you got it, after trying just about everthing and screwing up 2 more tires, shot a little water in one of the two cuts I put in the tire then fillup with ProBond , coated tire with vaseline and set on a old paper towel core so the excess glue would run out/away from the tire, tire now is still light and as hard as he--.
Old 04-14-2003, 12:11 PM
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Default Probond Caution

I used to use 30 gal's of mek a day to strip 3m 1300l
off glass radar an't no other way so there are hasards
in anything but probond poly is worth it i use it instead
of ca like was said IT IS GOOD BUT. CU
Old 04-15-2003, 03:46 AM
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Default Probond Caution

I remember painting the hangar deck with a light gray polyurethane, added light sprinkling of grit on top (while still wet) to aid in traction.

Used proper respirators and followed all precautions as required.

Local pigeon population failed to follow the same procedures, collected dead pigeons for 10 days after.

I have seen the danger of isocyanate's gassing out of paint, I Thank you for reminding us.

R. C.
Old 04-17-2003, 01:05 PM
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Default Dangerous Stuff

Good thread. I too use the Pro-Bond PolyU glue sheeting and love the stuff. I also work in a PolyUrethane Foam Mfg Plant, and the hazards of isocyanates are nothing to take lightly. I believe from the color and reading the label that the ProBond uses an MDI (diisocyanate) based catalyst package. It is a little sneakier in that it doesn't present a real foul odor and you can get a good dose of it without really noticing it.

We use mostly TDI here and that stuff is super nasty. Evaporates wildly at room temperature and burns the nose like ammonia if you get a good whiff of it.

As mentioned above, people get sensitised to the stuff. And the degree of sensitivity with onset of problems varies wildy from person to person. We constanly monitor the plant and maintain a less than 5ppb level in the plant atmosphere. But someone like Tommie might even have problems with that level. Our maintenance and proccess techs used forced air ventilation hoods when dealing with the stuff. It's really the best way to avoid exposure.

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