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  1. #10751

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    Joe,

    Glad to hear that you were able to exchange work for flying this Friday.. I would say that was an excellent trade! I had my 88 Yak out 2 days ago and had some great flights. The wife got a flight in on the plane as well and she is really starting to like this plane a lot too. She was wondering if there was anyway to fit two of these into our Chevy Lumina 4 door sedan... I don't think so but who knows we might eventually end up with two of these. The 88 Yak is by far the best flying plane I have ever owned, I really like how axial it rolls and how little coupling there is between the controls.

    Sorry to hear about the guy losing his 78". I am considering building one of those myself and using a Pletty Evo in it.. we will see.

    James

    ORIGINAL: JoeAirPort

    And this time I saw the crappy weather coming so I took Friday off work. Yessssssssssss!

    Today I went back to my Xoar 22x8. Big mistake. I'm switching back to my MSC 22x8. It's a waaay better 3D prop.

    Today I saw an EF 78'' Extra 300 go in. Sniff sniff. Like losing a family member. The older gent has trouble seeing and flew way too far out. Lost it. Not sure if they ever found it. Sad.

  2. #10752

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    Flew my 88 Yak on Saturday for two flights. Had a great time and engine/plane flew great. But on the 2nd flight the exhaust header broke and ended my day early. I do have a replacement header in my inventory...the one I was gonna use on the Edge, so I'll put it in the Yak and order another one for the Edge.
    Really do like the Yak airplane.
    Thanks
    Barry

  3. #10753

    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    A quick heads up to anyone looking for an EF Russian Thunder 50cc Yak-54. We just received our container on Friday and have a few of these left that weren't already spoken for. Give us a call at 770-887-1794 and we'll get one on the way to you.
    EXTREME FLIGHT RC
    State-of-the-art Aerobatic Aircraft and Accessories

  4. #10754

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    ORIGINAL: EXTREME FLIGHT

    A quick heads up to anyone looking for an EF Russian Thunder 50cc Yak-54. We just received our container on Friday and have a few of these left that weren't already spoken for. Give us a call at 770-887-1794 and we'll get one on the way to you.
    Extreme Flight,

    Well the wife has been asking to fly my 88 Yak pretty often lately so who knows, we might need another one! Not sure of what color she would want but will keep this offer in mind. Just wondering, do you have many female Yak drivers out there?

    Thanks,

    James

  5. #10755

    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    Not many female Yak drivers James. There may be a yellow/black lurking around here but I am sure there are a couple of the Russian Thunder schemes.
    EXTREME FLIGHT RC
    State-of-the-art Aerobatic Aircraft and Accessories

  6. #10756

    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    Good looking color scheme and highly visible.
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    EXTREME FLIGHT RC
    State-of-the-art Aerobatic Aircraft and Accessories

  7. #10757

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    I'd like to second the call for everyone to check the cowl blocks as 2 of mine were loose on a new fuse that I received. The loose blocks ended up ripping the covering attached to the blocks. Not nice to have holes in your new plane.

  8. #10758

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    MikeCam,

    I have built quite a few different models and the Extreme Flight Yak 88 is by far the best constructed of any I have worked on. I did quite a bit of measuring and testing to see if the airframe was straight and mine was right on..didn't have to change a thing! I have measured real aircraft that were not as accurate. The instructions are quite good and any questions I have had during the build were either answered right away by EF or on this BB. Sorry to hear about your problem with the cowl blocks, they are fine on both of my Yaks.

    James

  9. #10759

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    A few pages back someone mentioned the same problem, I love EF stuff, just the way the blocks are glued on edge onto the round frame leaves a chance for vibration to loosen them. My first fuse with 75 flights last year had no such problems. Just something to watch for.

  10. #10760
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    It's a good idea to soak these block bases with thin CA. I had the 87" Yak and the blocks loosened. With this one I put plenty of thin CA on the bases and they have not loosened up after two years. Another thing is make sure to lean the low end as much as you can so it doesn't shake so much at low RPM's.
    Joe AP

  11. #10761
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    It's a good idea to soak the blocks a little on both sides of the former. Mine loosened up on my first 88" w/ a Brillelli 60 after a few hundred flights. I glued them and never had a problem again. I ended up selling the airplane to one of my friends and he put several hundred flights on it before selling it to another one of our friends. I'd really like to know how many flights that plane has on it. I saw it out flying a couple weekends ago and it is still looking and flying great. I know it has well over a thousand flights on it. I soaked some glue on the tabs of the one I have now as a precaution because I plan to put a lot of flights on it.
    Charles
    Fly Extreme!

  12. #10762
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    I do the same thing Charles. I go over the entire air frame and wick thin CA into the gaps. I do this on all servo pockets, firewall bla bla bla. I had a PAU Edge 540 servo pocket come loose once. After that all my servo pockets get a good thin CA soak when they go together. Go over all the covering. I build mine for years of flying. I have not had anything come loose on the Extra or Yak. Extra 3 years, Yak 2 years. No idea how many flights. Lots. The manual gives lots of good tips to keep the plane solid for a long time (and have read posts about people who skip this part). Another is the anti rotation dowels in the wings. Those get thinned epoxy on the bases. I paint the inside of the stabs with thinned epoxy like the manual says. This all leads to a plane that will not come apart. I may add glass to the wheel pants and cowling too (as I see cracks start).
    Joe AP

  13. #10763

    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    Right on the money Charles and Joe. A few extra minutes spent during the assembly process adding a little CA to high stress areas can really add to the longevity of your ARF. I always mention this in the manuals, but for those who have overlooked it here are some areas to pay attention to:
    -Add CA to all servo mounts
    -I always run a bead of CA around the joint between the root rib and the horizontal stab sheeting as well as the rib which holds the elevator servo. I do the same with the wing root rib and attached sheeting.
    -Thin CA around the anti-rotation pins in the wing and stab.
    -I usually thin some 30 minute epoxy with denatured alcohol and seal the edges of the elevator servo arm slot.
    -Thin CA to saturate the cowl mounting tabs.
    -CA on any fuselage joints that appear to need it.

    Like I said, this only takes a few minutes but really adds to the durability of your aircraft. I usually end up putting several hundred flights on aircraft over a couple of seasons before selling the airframes to local flyers. Many of them are still flying and holding up great.

    Another area that is often overlooked is regular maintenance. We must remember that these are high performance machines built very light and just like a racecar or motorcycle they need to be properly looked after and serviced. I always pull the cowl and look everything over after the first flight sessions to be sure everything is secure. When putting the plane away after a flying session I always check my kinkages and servos to make sure everything is tight and secure. Every 20 flights or so the cowl comes back off and I have a good look under the hood. There is no reason these planes won't last for many seasons with just a little TLC.
    EXTREME FLIGHT RC
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  14. #10764

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    Extreme Flight,

    Thanks for the tips, I spent the time to address all of these points on my model, I am hoping to keep it for a long time. The wife was also nice enough to build me sun covers for the whole plane so that the black covering does not get too hot in the sun and this gives the fuselage some protection during transport too. I wanted to mention one other thing that I have been doing on my Yaks. I found that if you fly on wet ( early morning dew, not rain) grass that quite a bit of water can get in the main wing recess in the fuselage and the thin balsa there doesn't like it..wrinkles up as it swells. So I have been sealing the recess with a couple coats of clear model dope. It adds almost no weight and also hardens/waterproofs the surfaces. Thinned Epoxy would work too but I like the smoother surface left by the dope. I really think that these models are worth the extra effort to protect them. I got 10 more glitch free flights on my 88 Yak today, what a nice flying day it was.

    James

    ORIGINAL: EXTREME FLIGHT

    Right on the money Charles and Joe. A few extra minutes spent during the assembly process adding a little CA to high stress areas can really add to the longevity of your ARF. I always mention this in the manuals, but for those who have overlooked it here are some areas to pay attention to:
    -Add CA to all servo mounts
    -I always run a bead of CA around the joint between the root rib and the horizontal stab sheeting as well as the rib which holds the elevator servo. I do the same with the wing root rib and attached sheeting.
    -Thin CA around the anti-rotation pins in the wing and stab.
    -I usually thin some 30 minute epoxy with denatured alcohol and seal the edges of the elevator servo arm slot.
    -Thin CA to saturate the cowl mounting tabs.
    -CA on any fuselage joints that appear to need it.

    Like I said, this only takes a few minutes but really adds to the durability of your aircraft. I usually end up putting several hundred flights on aircraft over a couple of seasons before selling the airframes to local flyers. Many of them are still flying and holding up great.

    Another area that is often overlooked is regular maintenance. We must remember that these are high performance machines built very light and just like a racecar or motorcycle they need to be properly looked after and serviced. I always pull the cowl and look everything over after the first flight sessions to be sure everything is secure. When putting the plane away after a flying session I always check my kinkages and servos to make sure everything is tight and secure. Every 20 flights or so the cowl comes back off and I have a good look under the hood. There is no reason these planes won't last for many seasons with just a little TLC.

  15. #10765

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    ORIGINAL: EXTREME FLIGHT

    Right on the money Charles and Joe. A few extra minutes spent during the assembly process adding a little CA to high stress areas can really add to the longevity of your ARF. I always mention this in the manuals, but for those who have overlooked it here are some areas to pay attention to:
    -Add CA to all servo mounts
    -I always run a bead of CA around the joint between the root rib and the horizontal stab sheeting as well as the rib which holds the elevator servo. I do the same with the wing root rib and attached sheeting.
    -Thin CA around the anti-rotation pins in the wing and stab.
    -I usually thin some 30 minute epoxy with denatured alcohol and seal the edges of the elevator servo arm slot.
    -Thin CA to saturate the cowl mounting tabs.
    -CA on any fuselage joints that appear to need it.

    Like I said, this only takes a few minutes but really adds to the durability of your aircraft. I usually end up putting several hundred flights on aircraft over a couple of seasons before selling the airframes to local flyers. Many of them are still flying and holding up great.

    Another area that is often overlooked is regular maintenance. We must remember that these are high performance machines built very light and just like a racecar or motorcycle they need to be properly looked after and serviced. I always pull the cowl and look everything over after the first flight sessions to be sure everything is secure. When putting the plane away after a flying session I always check my kinkages and servos to make sure everything is tight and secure. Every 20 flights or so the cowl comes back off and I have a good look under the hood. There is no reason these planes won't last for many seasons with just a little TLC.
    As a full scale pilot for a major airline I can attest to what Chris is saying. The same is true for full scale planes, inspections must be done even if nothing is wrong or suspected wrong. It is called preventative maintenance, it saves lives in full scale planes and it will save headaches and your wallet in RC planes.
    Jeff Williams
    Extreme Flight RC, www.bandegraphix.com, team Airtronics

  16. #10766

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    I'll have to agree with everyone on the thing CA-ing EVERYTHING.

    I happened to overlook (i forgot [:@]) to do it and prior to flying this weekend thought i'd go over everything. Good thing i did. My canopy blocks with the blind nuts were wiggling loose along with another piece of the canopy wood. Couple joints where the canopy sits were a little loose and a few other minor things. I took a good 30 minutes and went over every part of the plane with thin.

    In my mind, a bottle of thin CA is a lot cheaper then a new airframe.

  17. #10767
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    strip the covering and dunk it in a big 55 gallon drum of epoxy, let dry and recover

  18. #10768
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    ORIGINAL: diamondave

    strip the covering and dunk it in a big 55 gallon drum of epoxy, let dry and recover
    Then tie it to a rope and use it for a boat anchor.
    Joe AP

  19. #10769
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    use microballons, adds air and keeps it light

  20. #10770

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    My Edge is here! But I gotta finished the muffler repair on my 88 before I go on to build it.
    Maybe I'll get busy and do that tonight.
    I've had a great time flying the Yak this year.
    My friend Steve and I even flew a tandum flight a week or so ago. Our planes are exactly the same, gotta make sure you watch which ones yours. It was pretty cool. I tanked it but Steve flew very good. He's a great guy and a better pilot than me but I enjoy flying with him.

    Thanks
    Barry

  21. #10771

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    ORIGINAL: House2twist

    I'll have to agree with everyone on the thing CA-ing EVERYTHING.

    I happened to overlook (i forgot [:@]) to do it and prior to flying this weekend thought i'd go over everything. Good thing i did. My canopy blocks with the blind nuts were wiggling loose along with another piece of the canopy wood. Couple joints where the canopy sits were a little loose and a few other minor things. I took a good 30 minutes and went over every part of the plane with thin.

    In my mind, a bottle of thin CA is a lot cheaper then a new airframe.
    I wonder if anyone has ever put a G meter on one of these models to see what they go through as we thrash the sticks about? My point being is that the glue joints probably take a beating over time due to flying stress...and then what about the vibration? Wood is really good in that it does not fatigue like metals do but the glue can only take so many bending cycles..so yes, checking and regluing as needed is great advice.

    James

  22. #10772
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    i thought i heard someone once say that 30g's can happen on a viloent manuever, it was well beyond what i human could take i remember that

  23. #10773

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    RE: Extreme Flight 88


    ORIGINAL: diamondave

    i thought i heard someone once say that 30g's can happen on a viloent manuever, it was well beyond what i human could take i remember that
    Hmm, 30 G's would mean on a 20 lb. plane that the spar is loaded to 600 lbs.! Even 10 G's would be 200 lbs. This human would not be happy even at 5 G's, much better to torture a plane from a distance rather than to actually be in it. (grin)
    James

  24. #10774
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    i could be way off, i just think i remember my buddy who had a comp arf saying that supposidly they tested them up to 30gs, seems like a lot on a 27lb plane like his was...either way i wouldnt want to be in it.....when i took my flight in the at-6(my avatar pic) just coming out of a loop kinda made me nausious, did 2 in a row and i felt crappy, cold sweat on my forehead, sick stomach feeling, had to open the canopy and take it easy for a few minutes, never got sick, just felt crappy, i got more g's around my waste to start with than others though, haha.....anyway not sure how much we were pulling, was kinda gentle, well as gentle as can be coming out of a loop, doing rolls was awesome, felt great, did several in a row and i could have kept going, that was my favorite thing we did

  25. #10775
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    RE: Extreme Flight 88

    I'm at the engine mounting stage for my backup EF Yak 88.

    I have a DLE55 with the KS header/K86 rear exhaust ready to mount. I have tried the ES pipe and don't want to go that route.

    I have searched this site and the other site, and cannot find a single person using the KS86r canister on the 88 Yak.

    If anyone has some pictures please post them.

    Thanks
    Dennis
    Dennis Anders AMA 625293
    The Unfrozen Caveman Sport Flyer


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